Source material for your philosophy

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The Derveni Papyrus is a recommended text for anyone in the LHP.

As a student of the philosopher Heraclitus I was most excited to come across two new sources, which I think everyone who is a LHP thinker or magician might be interested in.

 

 

 

These are: Book 9 Chapter 1 Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

and

Derveni Papyrus

The first source deals with Heraclitus, the second with an ancient text that mentions Heraclitus.  Both Heraclitus and the writer of the Derveni Papyrus are grounded in the Orphic mysteries tradition, with Heraclitus living within reasonable travelling distance from two ancient oracles.  They are agnostics, who reject superstition, reject belief in mythological entities, and promote a type of process theory based upon the empirical method of what they sense and experience in the natural world.  Their world-view lacks the input of satellites and telescopes, for instance thinking the stars are bowls that catch fire from evaporating water, or the insight that the Earth is one small part of a vast cosmos of planets, stars and galaxies.

The Derveni Papyrus is around 2300 years old, written around 200 years after the death of Heraclitus, the writer influenced by Heraclitus.  The text was found in 1962 in the tomb of a Macedonian, conserved by an attempt to burn it on their funeral pyre.  Only in recent decades has technology become available to recover and then translate a large portion of what this text says. The Derveni Papyrus is described as one of the most important and oldest texts found of Western philosophy.

All the ideas in the LHP and the Western philosophical tradition are founded upon the ideas of thinkers such as those who wrote the Derveni Papyrus, but because of lack of texts from these writers, ideas have been misunderstood and incorrectly applied.  I draw attention to the above texts in order to give my readers a source of original definitions, which might cause a paradigm shift of thinking, as has happened to me after I read them.

As an example, does the reader understand the relationship of the elements of water, fire, earth and air to each other, especially in a step-by-step process, for instance that fire becomes moisture as it cools, becomes concentrated as water, then further solidifies as earth.  How there might be a significant difference between terms of air, winds and moisture, that air may not be in fact an element, rather moisture is.  That a daemon is not a demon, but a cause, that is the process of striking causing multiple opposites to spin and mix together to form something new.  How chaos may not be watery or water.  Why all things have inherent order, even though  everything is randomly smashing into each other.  Potential is those things that always exist, but come about in a kinetic state after they are driven and joined together by strife.

My future articles will be on the insights I have made from reading the Derveni Papyrus.